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We are pleased to announce our latest class offering:

 

ACLS - Advanced Cardiac Life Support

 

We offer the Initial Course (2 day) and the Renewal Course (1 day). Click the link for more details.

 

OSHA Compliance/Training

All classes are available in English or en español.

These are the OSHA training classes we offer:

OSHA Fire Extinguisher Safety

OSHA Bloodborne Pathogens

Heat Stress

Accident Investigation

Aerial Lifts

Confined Space

Emergency Evacuation & Response

Ergonomics

Facility Safety Assessment (FSA)

Fall Protection

Haz Com

Job Hazard Analysis (JHA)

Ladder Safety

Lock Out Tag Out (LOTO)

OSHA General Industry Outreach Training

Powered Industrial Trucks (Fork Lifts)

Safety & Health Programs

Walking Working Surfaces

 

OSHA Fire Extinguisher Safety

 

A fire extinguisher is an active fire protection device used to extinguish or control small fires, often in emergency situations. It is not intended for use on an out-of-control fire, such as one which has reached the ceiling, endangers the user (i.e. no escape route, smoke, explosion hazard, etc.), or otherwise requires the expertise of a fire department. Typically, a fire extinguisher consists of a hand-held cylindrical pressure vessel containing an agent which can be discharged to extinguish a fire.

In the United States, fire extinguishers, in all buildings other than houses, are generally required to be serviced and inspected by a Fire Protection service company at least annually. Some jurisdictions require more frequent service for fire extinguishers. At the time of service, a fire extinguisher tag is placed on the extinguisher to indicate the type of service perform (annual inspection, recharge, new fire extinguisher) and date of service.

There are two main types of fire extinguishers: stored pressure and cartridge-operated. In stored pressure units, the expellant is stored in the same chamber as the firefighting agent itself. Depending on the agent used, different propellants are used. With dry chemical extinguishers, nitrogen is typically used; water and foam extinguishers typically use air. Stored pressure fire extinguishers are the most common type. Cartridge-operated extinguishers contain the expellant gas in a separate cartridge that is punctured prior to discharge, exposing the propellant to the extinguishing agent. This type is not as common, used primarily in areas such as industrial facilities, where they receive higher-than-average use. They have the advantage of simple and prompt recharge, allowing an operator to discharge the extinguisher, recharge it, and return to the fire in a reasonable amount of time. Unlike stored pressure types, these extinguishers utilize compressed carbon dioxide instead of nitrogen, although nitrogen cartridges are used on low temperature (-60 rated) models. Cartridge operated extinguishers are available in dry chemical and dry powder types in the US and in water, wetting agent, foam, dry chemical (classes ABC and BC), and dry powder (class D) types in the rest of the world.

Fire extinguishers are further divided into handheld and cart-mounted, also called wheeled extinguishers. Handheld extinguishers weigh from 0.5 to 14 kilograms (1 to 30 pounds), and are hence, easily portable by hand. Cart-mounted units typically weigh 23+ kilograms (50+ pounds). These wheeled models are most commonly found at construction sites, airport runways, heliports, as well as docks and marinas.

Your fire extinguishers are only as effective as the people using them.

Fire Extinguisher Training services will help ensure that your employees have the confidence and skills necessary to take action should a fire occur at your facility.

The training program includes:

  • Overview of the fire protection equipment installed in your facility
  • Review of proper procedures and fire evacuation routes
  • Emergency preparedness training
  • Alertness to fire hazards
  • Review of the types of fire extinguishers and their proper use
  • Identification of the classes of fires and how each is fought
  • Indoor or outdoor hands-on experience
Know what you need to do even before fire occurs.

We will help you establish fire extinguisher training for your employees and advise you of the most current regulatory guidelines for proper workplace fire protection.

Regulatory Requirements:

OSHA 1910.157(g)(1) — Annual Training for Incipient Fire Training

Where the employer has provided portable fire extinguishers for employee use in the workplace, the employer shall also provide an educational program to familiarize employees with the general principles of fire extinguisher use and the hazards involved with incipient stage fire fighting.

OSHA 1910.157(g)(2)

The employer shall provide the education required in paragraph (g)(1) of this section upon initial employment and at least annually thereafter.

OSHA 1910.157(g)(3)

The employer shall provide employees who have been designated to use fire fighting equipment as part of an emergency action plan with training in the use of the appropriate equipment.

OSHA 1910.157(g)(4)

The employer shall provide the training required in paragraph (g)(3) of this section upon initial assignment to the designated group of employees and at least annually thereafter.

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OSHA Bloodborne Pathogens

 

A blood-borne disease is one that can be spread by contamination by blood.

The most common examples are HIV, hepatitis B, hepatitis C and viral hemorrhagic fevers.

Diseases that are not usually transmitted directly by blood contact, but rather by insect or other vector, are more usefully classified as vector-borne disease, even though the causative agent can be found in blood. Vector-borne diseases include West Nile virus and malaria.

Many blood-borne diseases can also be transmitted by other means, including high risk sexual behaviour.

Since it is difficult to determine what pathogens any given blood contains, and some blood-borne diseases are lethal, standard medical practice regards all blood (and any body fluid) as potentially infective. Blood and Body Fluid precautions are a type of infection control practice that seeks to minimize this sort of disease transmission. Blood poses the greatest threat to health in a laboratory or clinical setting due to needle disposal techniques.

Audience:

This course is designed for anyone with a reasonable chance of coming into contact with bloodborne pathogens such as:
• Correctional Officers
• Childcare workers
• Security guards
• Maintenance workers
• School personnel
• Hotel housekeepers
• Health and fitness club staff
• Tattoo artists

Students learn how to:

• Protect themselves from exposure to bloodborne pathogens
• Act when exposed to blood or blood-containing materials in the workplace
• Clean themselves and the area when exposed to blood or blood-containing materials in the workplace
• Tell or report any exposure to blood or blood-containing materials in the workplace

Features:

• Ideal for learners who prefer group interaction and feedback from an instructor
• Designed to meet Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requirements for bloodborne pathogens training when paired with site-specific instruction
• Available for first-time or renewal bloodborne pathogens training

 

Heat Stress

 

Students will learn to recognize the signs and symptoms of heat stress, as well as prevention and emergency response.

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Accident Investigation

 

Participants learn how to conduct an accident investigation.  Investigation components include securing the scene, emergency response, gathering facts and data, and interviewing witnesses.

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Aerial Lifts

Students will receive classroom knowledge of safe practices used when operating a Scissor Lift, Extensible Boom, Articulating Boom, and Aerial Ladder/Towers. Students will also demonstrate equipment operation proficiency of the Aerial Lift equipment available at their work site.  

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Confined Space

This course is designed to provide basic safety knowledge to confined space entrants, monitors, and supervisors. Students will learn how to identify a confined space, understand permit requirements, safety practices and precautions, and required components of a confined space program. 

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Emergency Evacuation & Response

Participants will learn emergency response and fire prevention as well as hazard recognition and evacuation.  In addition, students will understanding evacuation methods of notification; how to sweep the work area; work group assembly and head count.  

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Ergonomics

Ergonomics is the study of work tasks and their relationship  to human physical abilities. Students will about basic causes of musculoskeletal injuries. In addition, they will learn techniques to conduct office work environment ergonomic evaluations and explore options to minimize or eliminate musculoskeletal injuries. 

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Facility Safety Assessment (FSA)

Students will receive classroom knowledge of how to conduct an FSA.  Practical knowledge includes conducting An FSA at the work site to identify, describe, and eliminate facility safe hazards.  

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Fall Protection

This course is designed to provide fall protection knowledge when working at unsafe heights. Topics include the principles of fall protection, the components of fall a arrest system, fall restraint system, roof top fall protection, definitions, and related OSHA standards/regulations.  

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Haz Com

Students will receive classroom knowledge of how to manage chemicals in the work place. Participants will learn about their right to know about the chemicals they use, PPE and First Aid, Labeling, and Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS). 

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Job Hazard Analysis (JHA)

Students will receive classroom knowledge of how to conduct a JHA. Participants will learn how to identify job tasks and their associated hazards as well as identify methods to eliminate those hazards. 

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Ladder Safety

Students will learn about ladder selection, inspection, and use. Practical application includes onsite ladder inspecton and set up for use. 

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Lock Out Tag Out (LOTO)

Students will receive classroom knowledge about: Equipment shutdown and the equipment shutdown sequence, equipment isolation, application of LOTO devices, control of stored energy, equipment isolation verification, and reenergizing the equipment. Student will also learn key definitions associated with LOTO. 

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OSHA General Industry Outreach Training

Students will learn about: Bloodborne Pathogens, Egress & Fire Protection, Electrical Safety, Flammable & Combustible Liquids,Haz Com, Intro to OSHA,Machine Guarding, PPE, Safety & Health Programs, and Walking Working Surfaces. 

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Powered Industrial Trucks (Fork Lifts)

Students will receive classroom knowledge of how to operate a fork-lift safely. Practical application includes operational demonstration of all fork-lifts on the work site. Students must demonstrate proficiency in operating a fork-lift while employing learned safety practices. 

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Safety & Health Programs

This course is for employees in positions of authority who desire to have a robust safety program. Program components include: Management commitment and employee involvement, worksite analysis, hazard prevention and control, and safety and health training. 

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Walking Working Surfaces

This course is designed to identify and eliminate slip, trip, and fall hazards in the general work environment. Participants should have decision makeing authority to mitigate hazards after they are identified. 

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You can contact us via our Contact Page. If you'd prefer to give us a ring you can always call us at: 1-800-651-9290

Our Address

Phoenix, AZ, United States